www.hunterdon300th.org Hunterdon County, State of NJ

CELEBRATING
HUNTERDON COUNTY HERITAGE

Hunterdon at War: The home front from the French-Indian War to the War on Terrorism

Hunterdon County Celebrates 300 Years in 2014
EVENTS FUNDRAISERS VOLUNTEER PRESS PHOTOS CONTACT US
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

FEATURED EVENTS

February 28: A Proud Heritage: The African American Presence in the Sourland Mountains and Surrounding Area

SPECIAL PARTNER EVENTS

February 5: Readington Museums Present - A Weaving Demonstration
February 11:
Pleain Air Plus: Artistic Interpretations of Historic Lambertville and Neighboring River Towns
February 16: History of High Bridge with Author William Honachefsky
February 17
: The Postal History of East Amwell Township

LEGEND:
ORANGE = Lectures PURPLE = Special Event BLUE = Performances GREEN = Reenactment  PINK = Municipal Event
RED = Tour LIME = Headquarters Open BURGUNDY = Committee Meetings TEAL = Childrens' Programs
$ = Cost for Event T = Ticket Required R = Reservation Required (FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIC - SPECIFIC DETAILS WILL BE POSTED FOR EACH EVENT)
  Click to See Entire Calendar of Events
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

 

 

 

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READINGTON MUSEUMS PRESENT:   A WEAVING DEMONSTRATION
Domestic historians, Bev Altrath and Arlene Soong, will demonstrate various weaving techniques on assorted 18th c. looms. In the colonial period, household items such as towels, bed linens and blankets, working aprons, sacks, etc., were commonly manufactured at home, while finer fabrics for clothing, draperies and upholstery were imported from overseas via Britain. During the war for independence and for some time afterwards, it was considered one's patriotic duty to use only homespun fabrics for everything, including the newest fashionable clothing. Altrath and Soong concentrate on early weaving techniques, beginning with the medieval and renaissance periods as well as the more "modern" 17th and 18th c. They also showcase their skills by demonstrating hearth cooking, dyeing, period sewing, embroidery and gardening at the Shippen Manor in Oxford, and the MillerCory house in Westfield, NJ. Bouman-Stickney Farmstead, GPS address: 114 Dreahook Road, Lebanon NJ 08833.
This program runs continuously from 1 to 4 pm.
Donations welcomed.
For more information visit the Readington Museums Website or call 908-236-2327

 

   

HUNTERDON HERITAGE VOLUNTEERS MEETING
Public Welcome to Attend.
3 Chorister Place, Flemington
7pm - 9pm 

   

PLEIN AIR PLUS: Artistic Interpretations of Historic Lambertville and Neighboring River Towns
Silent Auction to Benefit Lambertville Historical Society
Rago Arts and Acution Center
Cherry and North Main Streets, Lambertville
5:30 pm to 7:30pm
For more information visit the Lambertviille Historical Society's website or call 609-397-0770

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History of HighBridge with Author William Honachefsky
Local author William Honachefsky will be presenting a talk and book signing for his new historic postcard collection book "High Bridge" at the North County Branch Library on Thursday, Feb. 16 at 7pm. The history of High Bridge is intertwined with the development of the iron and steel industry in the United States. As early as the 1700s, the framework of this little hamlet had already been created by English investors who carved up the rich wilderness of the New World, brimming with iron ore that would be essential to the county’s development. High Bridge Borough evolved around the Taylor Wharton Foundry, established in 1742. With the passage of time, however, High Bridge has lost its farming and foundry roots, evolving into what is often referred to as a bedroom community. Just like the lofty trestle from which High Bridge derived its name, the city now runs the risk of being lost to time, forsaking the resilient character of the immigrants who forged a nation. The book is filled with 19th and 20th century postcards of a bygone era in the borough. William Honachefsky, of Clinton Township, is a lifelong resident of Hunterdon County and a passionate advocate for the protection of the state’s natural environment and historic heritage. He has served on the New Jersey 350th Commission and Union Forge Heritage among others.
North Branch County Library
65 Halstead Street, Clinton
7pm
Click for More Information

 

 

($) THE POSTAL HISTORY OF EAST AMWELL TOWNSHIP
Wait a minute, Mr Postman! Where have all the post offices gone?
Where was and what happened to the Reilleyville Post Office? Where was the Amwell Post Office? These and other interesting postal facts will be discussed by local philatelist Jim Walker discusses the Postal History of East Amwell.
Author of the acclaimed 2008 book Postal History of Hunterdon County, Walker will talk about the Swift Sure Stage Line hauling mail along the Old York Road, mail on the Delaware and Raritan Canal and mail even posted on the Black River and Western Railroad line. He’ll also tell you about the great increase in the number of post offices in East Amwell in the mid 1800’s and how their demise came about in the 1900’s. His PowerPoint presentation showing local pictures and postal history from his vast collection will be an interest to all.
East Amwell Township Municipal Building
7pm
$5
Proceeds will benefit work on the Clawson House
Sponsored by the East Amwell Township Historical Society.

 

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A Proud Heritage: The African American Presence in the Sourland Mountains and Surrounding Area
In honor of Black History Month, join Elaine Buck, Beverly Mills, and John Buck, the President of the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association for a very special program of untold stories about the lives of local African American men and women buried in the Stoutsburg Cemetery including a veteran who fought in the Revolutionary War.  The cemetery is located in what is now Hopewell Township in Mercer County, but was part of Hunterdon (Amwell Township).  The history of the Stoutsburg Cemetery will also be discussed which was originally purchased in 1858 by three African American men seeking a burial ground for people of color who could not be buried alongside whites.  This cemetery has been lovingly restored by the current Board of Trustees.  A part of Hunterdon's early history about how enslaved and free people were instrumental in building this region, serving in the military and how contributing to the economy.
7 pm,
Main Branch of the Library
Free
Reservations Strongly Recommended
Refreshments Follow


RESERVE YOUR TICKETS NOW!!

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The Hunterdon County Tricentennial is a Federal 501C3 Not For Profit Organization: Tax returns available upon request.
www.hunterdon300th.org